Great Gateway

6x6 Posts and slightly curving crosspieces

6×6 Posts and slightly curving upper crosspieces

Another view. The fence meets the 65% open above 30" requirement for front yards.

Another view. The fence meets the 65% open above 30″ requirement for front yards.

The Jailbar lattice is set into dadoed rails.

The Jailbar lattice is set into dadoed rails.

Standley Lake Open Space Rail Fence

2 rail fence, cedar

6×6 posts and 2×8 rails

Nice fence, with specialty post caps from Atlanta Post Cap Company

Nice fence, with specialty post caps from Atlanta Post Cap Company

Cantilevered Gate System

Cedar Drive Gate – Steel Post and Frame

Front view, minimal view of steel

Front view, minimal view of steel. When the gate opens IN, the post is completely hidden from view. When the gate opens OUT though, a small part of the steel is visible.

Inside view. This is a single gate, the double gate is twice as fancy.

Inside view. This is a single gate, the double gate is twice as fancy. Big gates made of wood only are notoriously hard to maintain. This way is expensive, but very durable with no sagging.

Robert E Loup Community Center

The fence is out-of-the-box, but the handrail is custom

The fence is out-of-the-box, but the handrail is custom

Steel  Fence, sometimes called wrought iron

This is the MontagePLUS Classic by Ameristar

Two New Horizontal Fences

Privacy Fence Denver

This fence must be solid-stained, or painted

T&G 1x6's for ultimate privacy

T&G 1×6’s for ultimate privacy

Step the fence for elevation changes

Step the fence for elevation changes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sleek Style

Sleek Style

Clear Cedar Pickets

Clear Cedar Pickets

2Ponds3

2 Year Old Horizontal Fence (by Alpine)

Look into the future. This is what you can expect our fence to look like a couple years from now.

Nice, right?

Old Horizontal fence1

This is at 25th and Stuart. Sloan Lake adjacent.

Notice the boards. They are as straight as the day we put them up. Now drive around YOUR neighborhood and look at how bad some of the other horizontal fence look after even 6 weeks.

Notice the boards. They are as straight as the day we put them up. Now drive around YOUR neighborhood and look at how bad some of the other horizontal fence look after even 6 weeks.

It costs more to do it right (these are 3/4" custom-sawn boards) but it's worth it for long-term beauty.

It costs more to do it right (these are 3/4″ custom-sawn boards) but it’s worth it for long-term beauty.

Twig Rail on Existing Posts

Installing rail (8/27/15) for a remodel.

Installing rail (8/27/15) for a remodel.  That’s Juan good installer, he’s been with us for 9 years.

We are attaching to existing posts with aluminum brackets.

We are attaching to existing posts with aluminum brackets.

A little bit closer look. Notice the nubs, where old twigs used to grow. (Well, if this wasn't a metal railing.) The branches are veined and very natural looking.

A little bit closer look. Notice the nubs, where old twigs used to grow. (Well, if this wasn’t a metal railing.) The branches are veined and very natural looking.

The rail is all hand bent and hand made. Each pice is different and reflect the sensibilities of the craftsman who makes it.

The rail is all hand bent and hand made. Each piece is different and reflect the sensibilities of the craftsman who makes it.

Well Engineered Horizontal Fence

Louisville horizontal fence

Steel posts, wrapped with cedar, clear pickets, stained grey

This is a shadowbox horizontal fence we’re building (early March, 2015) up in Louisville.

Because of heavy wind concerns, the posts are 3″ black steel. You cant see them because they’re wrapped with cedar.

The pickets are clear (no knots at all) and we’re staining the fence grey to match the surrounding structures.

This fence is engineered to withstand 120+ mph winds.

Stainless steel screws are used for the pickets, and the posts are 6′ on center.

More pictures as soon as we’re done.

 

 

Denver horizontal fence, high quality with steel posts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More pics below…

The gates had to be thinner, so the style is the same but they look slightly different. Not as much depth.

The gates had to be thinner, so the style is the same but they look slightly different. Not as much depth.

Steel posts (powdercoated, 3" 11ga.) set 3.5' in concrete. 6' apart. This fence is ridiculously strong.

Steel posts (powdercoated, 3″ 11ga.) set 3.5′ in concrete. 6′ apart. This fence is ridiculously strong.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very Pretty too.

Very Pretty too.

 

Amazing Before & After

Kind of a mess

Kind of a mess

Scalloped picket front, 6'+ Flat Top with Faux Posts rear.

Scalloped picket front, 6’+ Flat Top with Faux Posts rear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BeforeAfter

 

We also did the neighbor's fence

We also did the neighbor’s fence

 

 

 

 

 

 

A dog run

A dog run

 

 

 

 

 

 

A steel gate for a breezeway

A steel gate for a breezeway

 

 

 

 

 

 

And even a rubbish bin holder

And even a rubbish bin holder

Commercial Cages, and a Vinyl 3-Rail

Apartment Building Storage for Cardell Homes

Apartment Building Storage for Cardell Homes

Ranch Rail with wire (about $15/ft)

Ranch Rail with wire (about $15/ft)

No one has found the best way to attach the two. We use pan head screws since the plastic cable clamps break after a year.
No one has found the best way to attach the two. We use pan head screws since the plastic cable clamps break after a year.

 

Sometimes you need a sign.

I’m warning you….

Please Stop Saying That, You Sound Like A Moron

Whenever I hear someone say “We need to raise the bar,” my first thought is: “Won’t that make it easier?” I guess not everyone is a limbo dancer.

Another expression that gives me pause is: “Thinking outside the box.”  Last week a surly, neon tressed barista clubbed me with this one when I asked her why the smallest drink they have is a medium. “I can tell you aren’t creative,” she said art majorly, “You aren’t thinking outside the box.”  Hoping to avoid further abuse, I ha-ha’d softly and slid over to the register to pay for my medium coffee.

I was fatigued by all the banter so I didn’t have the strength to tell her that using a cliché to describe creativity makes less sense than telling someone to “shut up when you’re talking to me.”

Clichés aren’t always bad of course, but some of our speaking habits are and they can cause us to lose credibility with our bosses, or worse – our customers. A couple of years ago my company was building a fence for a guy I know, and he asked if we could paint it white.  “White as a sheep,” I assured him.

This guy laughed me out of his yard, down the street and around the corner.  I should have said sheet. If you’ve ever heard Stewie Griffin mocking Brian for his novel “Faster than the Speed of Love,” you’ll understand the ridicule I suffered.

None of us wants to seem stupid, and that’s plenty of reason to make sure we know what we’re saying before our lips start flapping.

Here are some of the words, phrases and ideas you’ve probably heard misused. They’re all worth looking up, especially if you aren’t sure of their meanings:

 

v  Raises the Question/Begs the Question

v  Regardless /Irregardless

v  Moot/Mute

v  Jibe/Jive

v  360/180 degrees

v  Literal/Figurative

v  Table a topic/Bring up a topic

v  Voila/Wa-Lah

v  Founder/Flounder

v  Decimate/Devastate

v  Pike/Pipe (coming down the)

v  Granted/Granite

v  Penultimate/Final

v  Flaunt/Flout

v  Supposedly/Supposebly

v  Either/Each

 

 

(If you can think of other misused words or sayings, please add them to the comments.)

While I’m thinking about ambiguity and catchy expressions, Waterloo is another one that slows my end of a conversation when I hear it, as in: “She fought City Hall and met her Waterloo.”

The way I understand it, Waterloo was Napoleons final defeat (and not a British plumbing system as I originally believed.) Okay, but Waterloo was also where the Duke of Wellington chalked up his greatest victory. So to me, hearing “Super Bowl XXXII was John Elway’s Waterloo” tells me the Broncos won the game – not that they suffered a crushing defeat. Maybe I’m just the kind of guy who always sees the glass as half greener on the other side of the silver lining.

I didn’t mean to write a pedantic article, but I guess I did. In any case, these kinds of verbal fumbles hurt our image and they’re worth knowing about. After all, if you have a smart boss and he hears you say something like “We lost our shirt on that deal – we need an escape goat,” he may just think you’re the perfect goat for the job.